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Carrot Ribbon Salad with Cara Cara Oranges

A salad is the perfect way to showcase heirloom carrots in all their beauty. They come in an amazing array of colors — deep purple, yellow, red, white, peach and of course orange. I couldn’t resist when I saw the beautiful rainbow of carrots at the farmers market. Shaving them into paper-thin ribbons is a great way to showcase their gorgeous colors. They make a stunning salad — just look at these beauties!

Historische Bunte Karotten Heirloom Carrotstion]
Plus they taste awesome. Heirloom carrots are mild, sweet and astoundingly flavorful. I’m convinced there’s less of that “carroty” taste. Which is fabulous news for those of us who aren’t really into carrots. You know, those of us who only eat them because we know how good they are for us.

I grew up being told how important it was to eat raw carrots, what seemed like, every day — yes, thanks to their crazy high beta-carotene content (vitamin A) – something that is very important for eye health — especially for kids, like I was, who love to read until all hours of the night, in the dark.

To get the most of their vitamin content, keep in mind when preparing your carrots, whether for cooking them or eating them raw, don’t peel the skin. Just like a number of vegetables, a lot of the nutritional value is just below the skin, so instead of peeling, choose organic and just give the skin a good scrub or using a paring knife to lightly scratch away the surface.

Carrot Ribbon Salad with Cara Cara Oranges

I paired these beautiful carrots with Cara Cara oranges, since not only do they have a gorgeous ruby color, but they are fleshy and sweeter than most oranges (comparable to tangerines), completely seedless, and really juicy. You’ll find them available at the market from December to April.

This super simple and delicious salad is really quick to prepare and pairs beautifully with grilled fish or couscous. If you don’t have multi-hued carrots on hand, orange carrots will also do the trick!

Carrot Ribbon Salad with Cara Cara Oranges
5 from 1 vote
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Heirloom Carrot Salad with Cara Cara Oranges

A heirloom carrot salad with Cara Cara oranges (pink navels) is the perfect way to showcase all these beautiful colors in a healthy and vitamin-rich salad recipe. Simple and delicious!
Course Salad, Side Dish
Category Mediterranean
Prep Time 15 minutes
Total Time 15 minutes
Servings 4
Autor Elle

Ingredients

For the salad:

  • 2 Cara Cara pink oranges, (also called Pink Navels), segmented, juice reserved
  • 8 organic heirloom carrots, scrubbed and using a vegetable peeler, shaved lengthwise into ribbons
  • a few sprigs flat-leaf parsley, coarsely chopped
  • roasted sesame seeds, garnish

For the dressing:

  • 2 tablespoons almond oil
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon fresh squeezed lemon juice
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • sea salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • 1/2 teaspoon honey

Method

  1. To segment the oranges: cut the top and bottom off the first orange so that you can stand it on a cutting board. Using a small, sharp knife, work your way around the orange, cutting off the peel and pith in strips so the juicy flesh is exposed. Then, holding the peeled orange over a bowl, slice down as close as you can to the sides of each membrane to release the fruit segments. Drop these into the bowl as you go, along with the juice that is released. Repeat with the other orange.
  2. In a small bowl, whisk together all the dressing ingredients, along with any juice you've collected from segmenting the oranges.
  3. In a serving bowl, add the carrots and orange segments; toss to mix. Add the parsley to the salad along with the dressing, toss, garnish with sesame seeds and serve.

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Asian Cucumber Noodle Salad

I love the thought of zucchini noodles but I can’t convince my favorite Schwabe of their worthiness. He claims that no zucchini compares to those fresh from the farmers market in France. He may have a point. Or perhaps it is just the surrounding atmosphere that makes them taste so much more….well flavorful.

Cucumber Noodle Salad – a new way to enjoy cucumber

So I relegate to using my spiralizer mainly for cucumbers. They make for an amazingly hydrating salad or side dish that is fantastically light and refreshing. Tossed in an Asian-inspired dressing, these perfect no-cook side of ribbony strands are great for twisting around your fork (or chopsticks) like noodles. Seriously delicious!

Get spiralizing

There are a number of ways to prepare a cucumber noodle salad. Check out this video to see how it’s done!

I served this with simple panko crusted (Japanese-style breaded) baked fish fillets– a great low-fat alternative that re-creates the crunch of fried, breaded fish. Yum!

Asian Cucumber Noodle Salad
5 from 1 vote
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Asian Cucumber Noodle Salad

Tossed in an Asian-inspired dressing, a refreshing cucumber noodle salad with its ribbony strands are great for twisting around your fork (or chopsticks) like noodles. Seriously delicious!
Course Salad
Category Asian
Prep Time 15 minutes
Total Time 15 minutes
Servings 2
Calories 88 kcal
Autor Elle

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon freshly grated of fresh ginger
  • 2 green onions, finely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • Juice of 1 lime
  • 1 organic English cucumber
  • 1 bunch fresh cilantro, leaves removed
  • 1 fresh red chili, seeds removed
  • 1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds, as garnish

Method

  1. In a small bowl whisk together the ginger, green onion, soya sauce, sesame oil and lime juice.
  2. To make the cucumber noodles, you can use a mandoline, a julienne peeler or a spiralizer. I prefer to use a handheld spiralizer create long noodles from the cucumbers. It works almost like a pencil sharpener.
  3. If using a mandoline, adjust the julienne blade to the desired setting and carefully run a cucumber down the blade, slicing the cucumber to form thin noodles.
  4. If using a julienne peeler, run it lengthwise until you reach the core then turn a ¼ turn and repeat all the way around.
  5. Transfer the cucumber noodles to a bowl and toss together with the dressing. Add the cilantro and red chili and gently toss again to combine. Sprinkle with toasted sesame seeds and serve. Enjoy!

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How did you like it?

Please let me know how this Asian Cucumber Noodle Salad recipe turned out for you! I would love to hear how you liked it. Simply rate it with the stars above ⭐or leave me a comment and rate it below.

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German Potato Salad with Cucumber

Potatoes (Kartoffel or Erdapfel) were first introduced into Europe in the 16th century via a Spaniard homeward bound from South America. From there they slowly spread throughout Europe. Although potatoes were already known in Peru and Chile as food, it was the Italians who first tried to cultivate the them in Europe. With little luck. Small and bitter, with poisonous leaves, they earned a bad reputation and these “fruits of the devil” were avoided until the 17th century, and then only for farmers and the poor. Named Tartufolo (truffles) by the Italians, it was the Spanish who first thought potatoes were truffles. Perhaps due to the way they grew in the ground…

So at first, potatoes popularity was only gained as a beautiful flowering plant until a century later, with some help of the botanical sciences, they were cultivated into the produce we know today. Today it is the world’s most widely grown crop with around 4,500 varieties. Yet, only a small percentage of these are actually used for food. The others are used as animal feed or producing vodka, starch products, flour, and the like.

The average German consumes a whopping 150 pounds (70 kg) of potatoes annually. Much of that in the form of a salad. This one with cucumber. So let’s take a look at how to make it.

German Potato Salad with Cucumber

How to make the best German potato salad

Firstly, there are two main components to a good potato salad – the potatoes and the vinaigrette.

The consistency of the potatoes is critical. It is important to choose the right type of potato for hard boiling. If you opt for starchy potatoes, your salad with resemble mashed potatoes in the end. Best choose smaller, waxier type potato, such as the red-skinned potatoes, new potatoes, fingerling, or white round potatoes. They have a better texture and hold their form after some mixing.

Potatoes are also best boiled in their skins so that they absorb less water – thus allowing them to absorb more of the sauce later. (smile). Plus it avoids a washed-out waterlogged flavor. When boiling the potatoes, they should be almost cooked through, yet firm. Use a paring knife to peel the potatoes. It’s much easier while they are still warm.

Potatoes soak-up a hot dressing more quickly than a cold one, so it is important heat the broth and add the vinegar before pouring it over the potatoes. Be prepared though, this salad still needs about 30 minutes to marinade.

German Potato Salad with Cucumber
5 from 1 vote
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German Potato Salad with Cucumber

The average German consumes a whopping 150 pounds (70 kg) of potatoes annually. Much of that in the form of potato salad. This one with cucumber. So let's take a look at how to make it.
Course Salad
Category German
Prep Time 40 minutes
Cook Time 25 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 5 minutes
Servings 4
Calories 394 kcal
Autor Elle

Ingredients

  • 1 to 1-5 kg potatoes
  • 2 small yellow onions, diced
  • vegetable broth (200 ml)
  • 6 tablespoons good-quality white wine vinegar
  • 1/2 cucumber, peeled, seeded and sliced
  • 1 bunch of chives, finely chopped
  • 6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons grainy Dijon mustard
  • sea salt & freshly ground pepper

Method

  1. Wash the potatoes and in a large pot, bring salted water to a boil. Add the potatoes and boil covered over medium heat for about 25 minutes. Drain, let steam evaporate and peel while still hot.
  2. Working in batches, slice the peeled potatoes into a large bowl. Add the onion and mix well.
  3. In a small saucepan, bring the broth to a boil with 3 tablespoons of vinegar; pour over the potatoes and gently mix. Let stand for about 30 minutes.
  4. Mix together the remaining 3 tablespoons of vinegar with the oil, mustard , salt and pepper.
  5. Add the cucumbers and chives to the potatoes and mix with the sauce before serving. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Enjoy!

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How did you like it?

Please let me know how this German Potato Salad with Cucumber recipe turned out for you! I would love to hear how you liked it. Simply rate it with the stars above ⭐or leave me a comment and rate it below.

Did you make any changes to this recipe?

If you have tips for other readers, let me know! It helps me and other readers so much. Sharing is Caring :-).