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Dips, Dressings & Sauces

Cucumber Radish Tzatziki

Okay tzatziki addicts, this is my new favorite tzatziki — cucumber radish tzatziki. It’s soooo addictive! I absolutely L O V E it! I hope you like GARLIC! Okay, there are two cloves, not enough to really scare off anyone. It is like the classic Greek dip after all. 🙂

Original Greek yoghurt is what defines a great tasting cucumber radish tzatziki

The ultimate success of how tasty your cucumber radish tzatziki recipe will be is simply the quality of the yoghurt you use – it really should be Greek. greek yoghurt is exactly what gives this dip the tasty rich flavour and creaminess. Full-fat Greek yoghurt is only 10% fat — far less than sour cream — is a good source of protein and it contains valuable microorganisms called probiotics which can help improve your digestive system, help your body absorb nutrients and improve your immune health. Look for a brand that contains active microorganisms called Lactobacillus bulgaricus.

Cucumber Radish Tzatziki

A few tips on making this cucumber radish tzatziki dip. Cucumbers and radishes have a high water content, especially when they are super fresh, so the more water you can squeeze out, the better this dip will be. I use a box grater to grate both the radishes and the cucumber, but a food processor can also be used.

I use regular radishes for this recipe, you could try French breakfast radishes, they are sweet, tender and mild and generally found at the farmers market. As for the standard variety “table radish”, I’ve heard that when harvested in the summer they tend to be spicier than spring radishes, which are used for this recipe. Not a fan of radishes? Then try this recipe for a classic tzatziki with carrots.

Cucumber Radish Tzatziki
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Cucumber Radish Tzatziki

This cucumber radish tzatziki is a flavorful dip, worthy of any Greek restaurant. It is the perfect accompaniment to pita bread, fresh vegetables, or used as a sandwich spread. It's fresh tasting, creamy and totally addictive!
Course Appetizer
Category Mediterranean
Prep Time 15 minutes
Total Time 15 minutes
Servings 4
Calories 118 kcal
Autor Elle

Ingredients

  • 1/2 an English cucumber, seeded and grated
  • 6-8 radishes, grated (plus some chopped leaves, optional)
  • 2 x 170 g plain Greek yogurt (full-fat)
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh dill
  • 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Method

  1. Place the grated cucumber and radish in a sieve, rest it on a bowl and lightly salt. Give it a stir, and leave to drain for 30-60 minutes. Stir now and again, helping it along by pushing the liquid out with a spoon.
  2. Alternatively, wrap the shredded cucumber radish mix in cheesecloth or a clean dishtowel and wring unit all of the water is out of the cucumber (the dryer the better).
  3. In a medium bowl, add the yogurt, cucumber, radishes, garlic, dill, lemon juice, and olive oil. Season with a little salt and pepper. Mix together until well combined. Taste and add more lemon juice or garlic depending on preference. Voila - so easy!
  4. Serve with warm pita bread or crudités. I like to serve the tzaziki with pita bread that is heated in a grill pan with a little olive oil. Or feel free warm the pita in the oven or even the toaster.
  5. Enjoy!

Notes

To prepare the grated cucumber, slice the cucumber in half lengthways and cut or scrape out the seeds – this is where most of the water content is. Grate the remaining cucumber using the large holes of a box grater. If I use mini cucumbers, I grate them whole without removing the seeds.

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Favorite Original Tzatziki (Greek Yogurt Cucumber Dip)

This original tzatziki and I new besties. Or shall I say reacquainted besties. A bestie that I just can’t get enough of lately.

I’ve always loved tzatziki, but I became particularly fond of it when we traveling the Peloponese coast of Greece. And to narrow things down even further, it was one particular restaurant in the little fishing village of Agios Nikolaos that got me hooked (no pun intended). Okay, so what was so special about this very Greek, very authentic tzatziki recipe? Besides the fact that it tasted awesome, it had carrots in it! GASP! How brilliant is that? As a not so keen on carrots person, I am forever trying to hide carrots in food or by some miracle trying to transform them into something amazing. And this authentic tzatziki did exactly that.

The best ever authentic Greek tzatziki recipe WITH carrot!

Okay, when I say best, I mean best in my books. Despite the dreary weather in Hamburg I’ve made this 4 times in the last two weeks! No summer feeling or Greek holiday required to enjoy fresh homemade tzatziki. Okay, that also means my carb-load increased as I like it best served with warm pita bread. I’ve tried the whole grain type because of course it’s the healthier choice, but my absolute favourite is good ole standard Greek style pita bread. Broccoli spears dipped in tzatziki are pretty good too.

Favorite Original Tzatziki (Greek Yogurt Cucumber Dip) with Pita Bread

Warm pita bread tastes best with tzatziki

Of course you can warm pita bread in the oven, but my personal favorite is “grilled” in a pan. It’s almost as if you put it on the BBQ. Just brush each side of the pita bread with olive oil, put it in a hot grill skillet and away you go. But there is a trick to getting those grill marks. My method is to lay a heavy skillet on top of the pita bread while it’s in the pan, just for a minute or two, then flip it over, “grill” the other side. Magical. So magical that Amazon even sells a fancy contraption made from cast iron, for exactly this. Fancy grilled sandwiches in a skillet.

Favorite Original Tzatziki (Greek Yogurt Cucumber Dip)

Homemade tzatziki is best if you prep the cucumber ahead of time

The key to a not a thick and creamy tzatziki is not just the original Greek yoghurt, but also drawing out the extra moisture from the cucumber. Cucumbers are packed with water! So you want to scoop out and discard the watery middle (I don’t do this if I use mini cucumbers) grate them, season them with a little salt and then let them stand in a colander over a bowl. Not only does the salt help draw out more of the water, but it also improves the flavour AND keeps the cucumber crisp.

Favorite Original Tzatziki (Greek Yogurt Cucumber Dip)
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Favorite Original Tzatziki (Greek Yogurt Cucumber Dip)

A delicious and easy Greek yogurt dip. Serve with warm pita bread, crudités or grilled meat.
Course Appetizer
Category Mediterranean
Prep Time 15 minutes
Total Time 15 minutes
Servings 4
Calories 103 kcal
Autor Elle

Ingredients

  • 2 x 170 g container authentic Greek yogurt (full-fat)
  • 1 English cucumber, seeded and grated (or two mini cucumbers) (*see note)
  • 1 small carrot, grated
  • 1/2 lemon, juiced
  • 1/2 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 tablespoon chopped fresh dill
  • 2-3 cloves garlic, minced
  • sea salt, to taste

Method

  1. Place the grated cucumber in a sieve, rest it on a bowl and add a little sea salt. Give it a stir, and leave to drain for 1-2 hours. Stir now and again, helping it along by pushing the liquid out with a spoon.
  2. In a medium bowl, add the yogurt, cucumber, carrot, lemon juice, olive oil, dill, garlic and salt. Mix together until well combined. Taste and add more lemon juice or garlic depending on preference. Done!
  3. Serve with warm pita, crudités, or for meat lovers, grilled lamb. I like to serve the tzaziki with pita bread that is heated in a grill pan with a little olive oil. Enjoy!

Notes

To prepare the grated cucumber, slice the cucumber in half lengthways and cut or scrape out the seeds – this is where most of the water content is. Grate the remaining cucumber using the large holes of a box grater. If I use mini cucumbers, I grate them whole without removing the seeds.

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French Dressing (klassische French Vinaigrette)

A good salad dressing is the basic foundation to ANY salad! Homemade salad dressing is so much simpler than you could ever imagine and tastes phenomenally better. Not only does this simple French salad dressing taste fantastic, it’s easy to whip together in minutes and is guaranteed to become your go-to dressing!

In North America, French Dressing refers to an oil and vinegar based dressing that is often rather sweet and it’s orange in color. In Europe on the other hand, French dressing is rather different. It’s made with vinegar, oil, Dijon mustard and garlic, and often some fresh herbs.

So how does tangy, sweet American “French” dressing differ?

  • Sugar is added for sweetness
  • Paprika, how it gets some of its color (plus, it gives the dressing a little extra spice)
  • Ketchup is also an ingredient, also lending to its red to orange color
  • Worcestershire sauce

Then there is Catalina Dressing, invented by the food company Kraft, which I’m pretty sure is just the more red and a little bit sweeter version of the basic American Style French Dressing. Both, quite tasty but as a every day, go-to stand by dressing that I can use over and over again, I prefer the original. It’s easy to make, goes with everything and once you made it a couple of times it’s one of those dressing you can throw together without a second thought.

French Dressing (klassische French Vinaigrette)
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Classic French Dressing

In Europe, French dressing is rather different than the American recipe. It's made with vinegar, oil, Dijon mustard and garlic, and often some fresh herbs.

Course Dressing, Salad
Category Mediterranean
Prep Time 5 minutes
Total Time 5 minutes
Servings 4
Autor Elle

Ingredients

  • 4 large handfuls of your favorite lettuce leaves or baby greens

For the salad dressing:

  • 6 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons good-quality red wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon of Dijon mustard
  • 1 clove of garlic, minced
  • sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

Method

  1. Combine ingredients in a small ceramic bowl. Whisk until well combined. Alternatively, use a small jar, put the lid on it and shake well.
  2. Toss gently with greens until coated.

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Plum Chutney with Sour Cherries

Thanks to the smell of homemade plum chutney my place smelled amazingly cozy for a dismal, rainy summer day. Plum chutney has got to be the most tasty sweet-and-tangy spreads out there. It’s perfect for serving with grilled or roasted meats, a cheese platter or get this, as a spread to give your next sandwich a flavorful punch.

Approaching the end of summer, I am actually quite happy (and sad!) to be introducing what could be considered the first of this year’s fall-inspired recipes. Yes, fall is all about eating warm, comforting foods, and for me, something that happens on weekends when I am comfortably wearing an old pair of jeans and an extra-soft oversized sweater — all the while listening to one of my currently favorite bands out of Dublin — Kodaline. They have two amazing albums. A song I particularly love is “All I Want” — and not to distract you from getting to the good stuff, like making chutney, I’ve included the VIDEO at the end of this page. 🙂

This was my first time making chutney and the recipe is so incredibly easy to make and the results are well…simply put…amazing! The inspiration comes from my favorite Schwabe’s friend Ulle’s homemade‏ rhubarb chutney recipe which I have been wanting to try for ages. But since I missed the boat with rhubarb season, I decided to use fresh, seasonal plums and considering the only thing I like about raisins or sultanas, is that they stem from the same vine that bears wine, I switched them out too.

Zwetschgen
Frische Zwetschgen

Here’s how I deviated from the original:

  • rhubarb = plums
  • sultanas = dried sour cherries (unsweetened)
  • powdered ginger = freshly grated ginger
  • brown sugar = organic raw cane sugar Mascobado

The plums I used are called “Zwetschge”, a popular European-style plum (also referred to as Italian Prune Plum or Empress Plum). You’ll recognize as them as the small, dense plums with a dark blueish or purple skin. They hold their form really well so make a great chunky style chutney.

We enjoyed this chutney with roasted duck breasts, something that happens about once a year. Mostly when I am in Geneva visiting my friend Magali. She’s the French queen of roasting duck. Not only does she have an amazing terrace for entertaining, but her barbecue is fitted with a marble slab that makes for a fantastic cooking stone! My dear Schwabe and I, on the other hand, in our city dweller apartment “sans balcon” roasted the duck in a enameled cast iron skillet. Très bien.

Entenbrust mit Zwetschgen Chutney
Duck Breast with Plum Chutney

The method for pan-roasting a duck breast is easy. In a nutshell, all you need to do is:

1) Score the the skin of the duck breast with a sharp knife and season well with salt and pepper.
2) In a little oil, cook the duck breast, skin-side down, for 15-20 mins (depending on the size of the duck breast), until the skin is crisp and brown.
3) Flip the breast over, cook on the flesh side for 3-4 minutes until browned, then turn off the heat.
4) Let the duck rest in the pan for about 10 minutes, then slice at an angle and serve. Voila! So easy. Serve with plum chutney and a side of steamed vegetables and enjoy!

If you are still not sure, here’s is a great resource for showing you exactly how to pan-roast a duck breast.

Be sure to bookmark this recipe, you may just find it’s the perfect complement your next Christmas dinner. Enjoy!

Plum Chutney with Sour Cherries
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Plum Chutney with Sour Cherries

A tasty sweet-and-tangy plum chutney made with dried sour cherries. Perfect for serving for Christmas or with grilled or roasted meats, a cheese platter, or as a sandwich spread.
Course Side Dish
Category Mediterranean
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 40 minutes
Servings 3
Autor Elle

Ingredients

  • 500 g plums, pitted and coarsely chopped (about 24 small plums)
  • 1 cup finely chopped yellow onion (125 g)
  • 1 cup dried sour cherries (100 g)
  • 1/2 tablespoon mustard seeds
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly grated ginger
  • pinch of cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • pinch of cayenne pepper
  • 2/3 cup soft brown sugar (I recommend GEPA organic raw cane sugar Mascobado) (100 g)

Method

  1. In a large saucepan, combine the plums, onion, dried cherries, mustard seeds, ginger, cinnamon, salt, and peppers. Bring to a simmer over medium-high heat, cook for a few minutes then add the sugar. Stir until combined and the sugar has dissolved.
  2. Reduce the heat to low, cover, and simmer until the chutney thickens and chunky sauce forms, stirring occasionally, about 30 minutes.
  3. Transfer into glass jars with a tight-fitting lid. Refrigerate and use within 2 weeks.

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Getting To Know: Ground Sumac Spice

Sumac has long been used as a seasoning in Middle Eastern and Mediterranean cuisine (most notably as a key ingredients in za’atar) and there’s good reason that it’s gaining increased popularity and is becoming a welcome addition to any spice cupboard.

Just a sprinkle of this Middle Eastern spice instantly improves any dish, making it a delicious and versatile all-you-really-need-just-one-spice that every kitchen and cook should have on hand.

With its clean tasting citrusy flavors and balanced mix of fruity and tart, it adds that essential brightness and zing to grilled chicken or fish, blanched vegetables, or rice. It’s superb over salads, tomatoes, cucumbers even raw onions (let us not forget, popcorn!) It is a virtuous spice for those evenings when you are feeling especially lazy or a little uninspired — you can kick up your feet and relax knowing that you can rely on a spice like this to pep up a quick and simple meal.

Added bonus: Sumac also has a number of health benefits — it is full of vitamin C and omega 3 fatty acids, it has antimicrobial and antioxidant properties and is known to help with indigestion.

Sumach Blume
Sumach Blume (Rhus coriaria)

And it might be surprising to learn that this dry red powder isn’t actually a true spice — it’s actually harvested from the fruit of the sumac flower, which when ripe is dried and sold intact or is ground to the coarse deep red powder we know as sumac. You can even find it yourself if you are tromping along through the woods from early spring until late fall, but take heed, it’s a close relative to poison ivy and poison oak. So foragers beware. But, let I say, also unnecessary since this spice isn’t as hard to come by as you might think.

Where to Find Sumac:

You can find sumac in over-priced gourmet shops, but you are better off popping into your local Middle Eastern, Turkish, or Greek market, that where I get mine. But if all else fails it can comfortably be ordered online from a number of spice shops…even Amazon.

How to Use It:

The most basic use for sumac is to simply dust it on top of whatever you are making — whether it be fresh greens, a feta, tomato and cucumber salad, grilled halloumi or pita bread. Or keep dinner light and fresh by creating a sumac-infused yogurt dressing and serve it tossed with your favorite greens, a sweet apple and a little chopped fennel or kohlrabi:

Sumac-infused Yogurt Dressing

Yields enough dressing for a 4-6 person salad

INGREDIENTS:
1 cup natural yogurt
juice and zest of 1 organic lemon
1 clove garlic, minced
2 tablespoons fresh mint, finely chopped
1/2 teaspoon ground sumac, plus more for garnish

METHOD:
Whisk together the following in a small bowl. Toss with your choice of greens, sprinkle with sumac and serve.

How to Substitute it:

It just may be that there is no perfect substitute for the complex sour lemony taste of sumac, it’s more about balanced tartness rather than pure lemon acidity.
It works well in lieu of lemon, but if you’re following a recipe that calls for sumac and you’re in a fix, I would try:

a) a little lime juice
b) ground black pepper with lemon zest
c) fresh lemon juice with a dash of paprika

Looking for other recipes with sumac?

Or take a look in my Archive!

 

Seasonal Spotlight: Chive Buds & Blossoms

Chives with their beautiful purple buds are one of the prettiest things I’ve stumbled across at the farmers’ market lately. And guess what? The entire plant is edible, even when in full bloom with its pale purple flowers!

You’re probably familiar with chives and their delicate just-the-right-amount-of onion-without-being-overpowering flavor. But what about their pretty little buds or blossoms? Just like the stem, both the purple buds and the light purple flowers are flavorful and aromatic with a mild, light onion flavor. They are perfect for adding a decorative touch to any savory dish, tossed in a salad, or for jazzing things up with infused vinegar. Here’s a chive blossom vinegar recipe straight from the Day Ferry Organics farmers chronicles. So next time you’re thinking of abandoning these purple beauties to the compost, think again. You can even take advantage of the lovely color and add the buds or flowers to a simple (and pretty) cheese spread or toss with a bowl of mixed salad greens.

Look for them at your farmers’ market in the spring and summer. Or simply, grow your own chives in an herb garden or kitchen window — and for keeping them fresh, refrigerate them in a plastic bag for up to a week.

What about the stems? With their fresh fragrance and delicate onion flavor, the stems themselves are infinitely useful in cooking. And because they’re mild, you can also use them generously and enjoy the bonus of their invigorating bright green color. Here’s some ways to put them to use:

    • As a garnish for soups and salads
    • As herb butter for using on fish, vegetables, grilled corn on the cob, baked potatoes, etc.
    • To enhance the flavor of sauces and salad dressings
    • Add color to potato salads
    • For seasoning fish
    • Sprinkled generously over a bagel spread with cream cheese (yum!)

Plus chive vinaigrette couldn’t be simpler to make at home: just whisk together some good-quality olive oil, a splash of white wine vinegar, some minced garlic clove, and of course a ton of fresh chopped chives.

NOTE: When cooking, be sure to add chives at the end of cooking time to retain their flavor and nutrients.

Here’s a deliciously simple recipe using fresh chives:

Chive Butter

INGREDIENTS:
4 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
2 tablespoons grated parmesan
1 tablespoon finely chopped chives
1/4 teaspoon coarse sea salt
freshly ground black pepper, to taste

METHOD:
1. Bring butter to room temperature.

2. In a small bowl, mix together the butter, parmesan, chives, salt and pepper with a fork until well combined.

3. Let stand for at least 15 minutes so the flavors can meld, then chill in the refrigerator until firm.

Some chive facts:

  • Cousins of onions, leeks, and scallions, chives are the smallest edible onion
  • “Chives” is often referred to only in plural form because they grow like a cluster rather than alone
  • Although attractive to bees, chives have insect-repelling properties that dispel many insects and garden pests
  • Chives were once believed to hold magical powers that protect against evil spirits and diseases

Chive Buds & Blossoms

  • Colonists in the New World hung chives in bundles in their home as protection
  • Romans believed that chives had the power to relieve pain and used it to ease sore throats and sunburns
  • Romanian Gypsies used chives as part of their fortune telling rituals
  • Chives are one of the richest sources of vitamin K (8% of daily value in just one tablespoon). Vitamin K helps reduce inflammation throughout the body and anchors calcium inside the bones and prevent osteoporosis. It’s also essential for blood clotting.

Lemon Balm Pesto

A new favorite: Lemon Balm Pesto! I am always dreaming up ways to incorporate more fresh summer herbs into my diet. Pesto is just the way to do it! This time with fresh lemon balm & basil, cashews, tangy lemon, and parmesan (vegan alert: this also tastes great without the cheese!).

Lemon balm is such a lovely herb. So beautifully fragrant and subtle to the palate, it’s the perfect companion for basil in a fresh summer pesto. Lemon balm is closely related to mint, although it smells a lot like lemon, don’t expect a lemon burst here. It’s not a major player in the kitchen, but definitely has it’s place. It’s most commonly known as a medicinal plant (and as a fabulous attractant for bees in the garden).

Lemon Balm Leaves

Some of the more familiar uses are (I use “familiar” lightly — I hadn’t the foggiest) to help reduce stress and anxiety, promote sleep, improve appetite, and ease pain and discomfort from indigestion. A tea made from lemon balm leaves is also said to soothe menstrual cramps and helps relieve PMS. Just put some fresh leaves in a cup along with some boiling water. It’ll have you relaxed and at ease in no time. It’s also great served as iced tea with honey. And if you are looking for more ways to make use of those fragrant leaves, just toss a few in your next salad.

Pasta with Lemon Balm Pesto

How to use Lemon Balm Pesto

Super versatile, pesto is also totally delicious tossed together with steamed vegetables, spread on grilled fish or chicken, mixed with blanched greens beans or sugar snap peas, as a spread in your favorite panini, on baked potatoes instead of butter, or as a flavor enhancing garnish for soups, stews and risottos… pretty much anywhere you can think of. The possibilities are quite endless, as are the variations of pesto.

For a no nonsense dinner, pesto is of course great on pasta – simply stir everything together until coated (I add a little reserved cooking water from the pasta to moisten it), maybe stir in a few handfuls of baby arugula, then season with salt and pepper, plus maybe a little ground chili or a generous squeeze of lemon. Yum!

For a VEGAN version, just skip the cheese. Also tastes great!

Lemon Balm Pesto
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Lemon Balm Pesto

Lemon balm pesto with fresh basil, cashews, tangy lemon, and parmesan (vegan alert: this also tastes great without the cheese!). Totally healthy, easy and delicious.
Course Sauce
Category Italian
Prep Time 10 minutes
Total Time 10 minutes
Servings 375 ml
Calories 303 kcal
Autor Elle

Ingredients

  • 2 cups packed lemon balm leaves
  • 2 cups packed basil leaves
  • 4 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1/2 cup cashews (almonds, hazelnuts, walnuts, and pine nuts all work well too) (50 g)
  • 1/4 to 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil (60-125 ml)
  • freshly squeezed juice from 1 lemon (about 4 tablespoons)
  • 1/2 cup parmesan (50 g)
  • salt to taste

Method

  1. Put all the ingredients for the pesto in a food processor and blend until smooth.
  2. No food processor? No problem, I use a handheld mixer for the same results. Or go traditional... when it comes to making pesto, you can't go wrong with a pestle and mortar.

Notes

To store:

  • In the fridge…Transfer the pesto into glass jar(s) and top with a little olive oil to completely cover the surface (this stops the basil from oxidizing and turning brown). Keep in the fridge for up to one week; some argue it’ll last up to three.
  • In the freezer…If doing this, omit the cheese from the recipe and add it after you've defrosted the pesto. Transfer to a freezer friendly container or – TIP -- spoon the pesto into an ice tray, freeze until solid, then remove the pesto “cubes” from the tray and transfer to a plastic freezer bag. Defrost as many cubes as you need at any one time by storing them in the fridge overnight. Voila, so easy!

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Sage – The Holy Herb

In Greek mythology, sage was believed to be a powerful protector and healing agent that was sacred to the gods.

It was also commonly believed to strengthen the memory, hence “a sage”, or wise man with a many memories and profound wisdom. Seeking immortality? According to Medieval folklore, all you have to do is take a little sage each day (especially in May!). There is also the ancient art of burning sage, which is also practised today. “Smudging” ceremonies are performed to purify and cleanse your home and negative energy and influences.

ORIGIN & FLAVOR PROFILE:

Sage is native to the northern Mediterranean coast and frequently used in Mediterranean cooking. It’s long slender leaves have a uniquely fuzzy texture and musty flavor reminiscent of eucalyptus, cedar and mint with a hint of lemon. It combines well with rosemary, thyme or marjoram. Careful though, it should be used with discretion, as it’s flavors can quite easily overwhelm a dish.

HEALTH BENEFITS:

There are a number of health benefits associated with sage:

  • As a mouthwash, it is said to freshen the breath and help in alleviating sensitive, bleeding gums.
  • In a bath, it’s oils helps reduce inflammation and ease rheumatism and aching limbs.
  • Due to its antiviral, antibacterial and antiseptic properties, it’s known for its ability to kill bacteria.
  • As a seasoning, not only does it flavor food, but is said to prevent spoilage. Plus it’s rich in vitamin K, which is important for bone health.
  • It also aids digestion, reduces high blood sugar and remedies night sweats.
  • Sage tea is also a great remedy for soothing a sore throat.
Salbei auf dem Markt
Fresh sage at the markt

CULINARY USES:

Sage’s aromatic and strong flavor compliments game, pork, beef, duck, chicken and as well as the stuffing that’s served along with it. It’s a great companion to pretty much any fatty food as it aids in digestion of greasy foods. How can you not love an ingredient that loves fat? It’s perfect partner for foods rich in oils and fats. It also blends well in sauces, soups, meat pies as well as with mild cheeses and vegetables such as onions, carrots, eggplant, squash, and tomatoes.

If you have more fresh sage than you know what to do with, here’s a simple and tasty recipe (otherwise, try drying it!):

Butter and Sage Sauce

A browned butter and sage sauce goes perfectly with gnocchi or your favorite pasta.
Serves 4

INGREDIENTS:
6 tablespoons butter
10 large sage leaves, finely chopped
juice of half a lemon
1/3 cup grated parmesan, plus more to garnish (35 g)

METHOD:
While the pasta cooks, melt the butter in a non-stick skillet over medium heat; cook until light golden brown in color. Add the sage leaves and remove from heat. Add lemon juice and set aside. Drain the pasta, reserving some of the cooking liquid. Add the pasta to the pan and return to heat. Add a little of the cooking liquid, then the cheese, toss to coat and serve immediately. Garnish with additional parmesan and enjoy!

This is a classic. So simple and so so good!

Hazelnut Pesto

I mean who could say no to creamy homemade hazelnut pesto made from fragrant roasted hazelnuts? The robust flavor of the roasted hazelnuts gets a nice brightness from the lemon zest and lemon juice, and when whirled together with a generous glug of olive oil and a large handful of flat-leaf parsley and peppery arugula, plus a little parmesan, not to mention garlic, the pesto comes together as a well-rounded sauce that is brimming with flavor and texture. The aroma of the roasted hazelnuts alone is amazing!

I love pesto, in all its forms. So tasty, so versatile and so easy to make at home. It’s amazing. Having pesto on hand is perfect for throwing together a quick meal. It keeps for 3-4 days in the fridge, some say longer as long as it has a thin layer of olive oil on top – I usually make sure I have enough left to throw in the freezer for the next time and other times I just go on a pesto binge and devour it.

Farfalle with pesto

Perfect served on a tomato-mozzarella sandwich, as a topping for crostini, tossed together with giant white beans or boiled new potatoes, and of course as sauce for pasta. And I’m willing to bet it tastes great as a pesto crust for chicken or a nice firm white fish. I’ll definitely have to try the latter!

Hazelnut Pesto

If you are going to make this pesto as a sauce for pasta, reserve about 1/2 a cup (125 ml) of the pasta’s cooking liquid so you can add a little bit at a time to the pasta when you toss it with the pesto. This will help the pesto loosen up a bit and help create more of a sauce-like consistency.

Hazelnut Pesto
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Hazelnut Pesto

Roasted hazelnut pesto gets a nice brightness from the lemon zest and lemon juice, whirled together with flat-leaf parsley and peppery arugula, plus a little parmesan, not to mention garlic. Yum!
Course Sauce
Category Mediterranean
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 20 minutes
Servings 1 cups
Autor Elle

Ingredients

  • 1 cup hazelnuts, lightly roasted and skinned (130 g)
  • 1 bunch fresh flat-leaf parsley, stemmed
  • handful arugula leaves (35 g)
  • 1 large clove of garlic, roughly chopped
  • zest and juice of 1 organic lemon, about 2 tablespoons
  • 1/4 cup grated parmesan (30 g)
  • enough olive oil to achieve proper consistency, about 1/2 cup or more
  • sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 350° F / 180°C.
  2. On a baking sheet toast hazelnuts in one layer in middle of oven for 10 to 15 minutes, or until golden and skins are blistered. Wrap the hazelnuts in a clean kitchen towel and vigorously rub the towel around them to remove the loose skins (it’s fine if some skins don't come off). Set aside to cool.
  3. Put all the ingredients for the pesto in a food processor and blend until it becomes a smooth-ish paste. The pesto should still have a good amount of texture from the hazelnuts.
  4. If the mixture is too sturdy, add more olive oil, one tablespoon at a time, pulsing briefly after each addition until the pesto reaches the desired consistency.

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Wild Salad Greens & Herbs in a Lemon Dressing

A good salad dressing makes even the simplest plate of greens memorable.

Go wild and load up on a combination of wild greens, baby greens and herbs this spring! With a lemon dressing this is a tangy, sharp, and refreshing salad. You can take a mix of any wild greens that are available this time of year at your local farmer’s market – or take a mix of baby greens such as kale, mizuna, tatsoi, mustard, arugula, and spinach. Whatever catches your fancy. Sprinkling a little freshly grated parmesan on top also works well in combination with the lemony tang of the dressing.

Wild Greens

Look for a mix of baby and wild greens at the market. Greens like Mizuna adds a lot of texture to salads and are typically sold as part of a pre-made salad mix, such as mesclun. It can also be purchased loose at the farmers’ market or specialty food markets. Mizuna has a fairly earthy, nutty flavor when compared to other salad greens.

Beet leaves are also a great addition. They are best-tasting when they are young and tender, with a slightly spicy flavor. Not only do they taste great, the greens with their thin purplish-red “veins” are visually striking and are great for dressing up any salad. When wilted, the “veins” become brighter in color and sweeter. Another reason to eat them: beet greens are a powerhouse of nutrients.

Wild Salad Greens & Herbs in a Lemon Dressing
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Wild Salad Greens & Herbs in a Lemon Dressing

A good salad dressing makes even the simplest plate of greens memorable. Go wild and load up on a combination of wild salad greens and herbs!!
Course Salad
Category Mediterranean
Prep Time 15 minutes
Total Time 15 minutes
Servings 6
Autor Elle

Ingredients

For the salad:

  • 1 handful wild salad greens (such as Mizuna)
  • 1 handful baby bok choy
  • 1 handful baby beet leaves
  • 1 bunch mint, leaves removed and chopped
  • 1 bunch parsley, leaved removed
  • 1 bunch cilantro, leaves removed

For the dressing:

  • 3 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon lemon zest
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 4 tablespoons cooking cream (15 % fat)
  • sea salt and ground black pepper, to taste

Method

  1. Combine lemon juice, lemon zest, garlic, Dijon mustard, salt and pepper in a bowl. Slowly whisk olive oil into the lemon juice mixture until thickened. Whisk cream into the mixture.
  2. Place the mixed greens and fresh herbs in a bowl. Drizzle with dressing. Toss gently to combine. Serve.

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Aunt Ilse’s Homemade Caesar Salad Dressing

Was ‘Caesar salad’ invented by or named after Julius Caesar? Or did it originate from the Italian owner’s of Caesar’s restaurant in Tijuana?

Whatever the true origin, the original recipe included romaine, garlic, croutons, and parmesan cheese, boiled eggs, olive oil and Worcestershire sauce. This caesar salad dressing recipe is a little different, and frankly my favorite, concocted by my great Aunt Ilse and passed along through the family over the years.

The caesar salad you love so much at restaurants is surprisingly easy and quick to make at home. Just toss the dressing with a head of romaine lettuce and top with fresh grated or shaved parmesan. I often make this salad served with homemade croutons as well, actually almost always. But I also love it served with romaine lettuce and radicchio topped with blackened cajun chicken. Yum!

Caesar Salad Dressing is easy to make at home

Wer Ceasar Salad im Restaurant mag, der kann das jetzt auch einfach zuhause machen. Einfach das Dressing mit Römersalat vermischen und geröstete Croutons darauf geben. Zum Schluss noch viel geriebenen Parmesan-Käse und gemahlenen Pfeffer drüber streuen und fertig. Ich gebe auch noch Radiccio und Hühnchen dazu. Lecker!

Chicken Caesar mit Tante Ilses Dressing für Caesar Salat

Opting for fresh croutons? No slighty stale bread on hand? No problem. It’s not 100% necessary. I more often than not use my favorite rustic loaf of German bread fresh from the baker for my croutons.

All you need to do is prep the bread by cutting it into bite size cubes, place the cubes on a baking tray, season them, bake and then let them cool. Baking croutons, rather than sautéing them in a skillet, which I mostly do, gives you the option to make lots. Just store the extra portions in an air tight container and use over the coming days.

I take an extra step creating my croutons from fresh bread. I partially dry them out in the oven and then season and sauté them in a skillet. This way I get a crispy outer crouton that is still a little chewy and springy on the inside. Just preheat the oven to 375°F / 190°C. Depending on the size of the croutons, bake in a single layer for 3-5 minutes, toss and bake for another few minutes. If I am using slightly stale bread, I skip the oven step and go straight to the skillet. Using a large skillet, sauté the cubes with some olive oil, minced garlic, dried herbs, such as thyme, oregano or an Italian mix and a sprinkle of salt. Sauté, stirring often, until golden brown. So easy and they add so much to a salad, or soup for that matter.

Tante Ilses Dressing für Caesar Salad
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Aunt Ilse's Homemade Caesar Salad Dressing

The original recipe included romaine, garlic, croutons, and parmesan, boiled eggs, and a homemade caesar salad dressing with olive oil and Worcestershire sauce.
Course Dressing
Category American
Prep Time 5 minutes
Total Time 5 minutes
Servings 4
Autor Elle

Ingredients

  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons good-quality red wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon dried mustard (alternatively grainy dijon mustard can be used)
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon Worchestershire sauce
  • 1 raw egg

Method

  1. Add ingredients into a jar, close, and shake to mix.

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Pesto 3-Ways

Glorious Pesto. A marvel of simplicity, I love this Italian green gem. Fresh, versatile and more than just a sauce for pasta, it’s can be used in any number of kitchen creations. It’s truly is a treasure of Mediterranean cuisine!

Since pesto consists of nothing more than a few key ingredients, the quality and variety of what you use really does matter. Select young herbs and young garlic (it’s much sweeter and juicier), coarse grained sea salt, and a delicate, buttery tasting Italian olive oil (olive oil made from taggiasca olives is a nice choice). And please don’t skimp on the cheese – go for the real deal – aged Parmigiano Reggiano or Pecorino.

Although pesto is usually a basil-based sauce, any mix of your favorite fresh herb will do. Basil, parsley or marjoram are mild and therefore make a good base for adding the stronger flavored herb such as sage or thyme. Probably best to start with a few leaves, then add more as you go along to find the taste you like best.

There are endless ways pesto can prepared and used – I’ve included three of my favorites. As to how you choose to use them, that’s up to you. But in case you are looking for ideas other than as a sauce for pasta or gnocchi, here are a few:

    • Layered in a baked pasta dish – makes for a great vegetarian lasagna.
    • Perfect on a panini or sandwich to add new flavor – I love a mix of basil pesto and sun-dried tomato on focaccia with fresh mozzarella (bocconcini), tomatoes and a little baby arugula.
    • Makes for a great homemade pesto vinaigrette – served over antipasto and salad greens.
    • Fabulous drizzled over vegetables or roasted potatoes.

Sun-Dried Tomato Pesto

        • 1 cup packed fresh basil (20 g)
        • 1 cup packed fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves (25 g)
        • 2 tablespoons pine nuts
        • 1/4 cup (about 6) oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes
        • 2 tablespoons, or more extra virgin olive oil
        • 4 cloves garlic, finely chopped
        • sea salt, to taste

Spring Pesto

        • 3-4 bunches chives or wild garlic (150 g)
        • 3 tablespoons ground almonds
        • 3/4 cup freshly grated parmesan (80 g)
        • about 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil (100 ml)
        • sea salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

Classic Genovese Pesto

        • 3/4 cup pine nuts, roasted (50 g)
        • 4 cups packed fresh basil (80 g)
        • about 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil (100 ml)
        • 1 cup pecorino (100 g)
        • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
        • sea salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

METHOD:
1. Blend all ingredients well until smooth.

2. Keeps for up to five days refrigerated, or store in the freezer for a longer duration.

Pesto Genovese Pasta

My friend Magali writes that with chilly winter temperatures in Geneva so she has been enjoying a lot of pasta these days. Yes, don’t we all do that? Cold day, forget a salad, let’s go for something a little more heartwarming and satisfying, right? So from Geneva with love: Pesto Genovese Pasta.

Traditionally, it’s prepared with a marble mortar with a wooden pestle. I have one and rarely use it. Magali swears that she doesn’t mind the extra work of doing it all by hand because it gives a different texture and a better flavor. I can buy that. But, traditions aside, the simplest way to make this sauce when you don’t have either a mortar nor the time is to use a blender or a food processor (keep in mind, the ingredients should not be heated in the blender, so just pulse for a few seconds, and then add the next ingredients).

Pesto Genovese Pasta
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Pesto Genovese Pasta

From Geneva with love: Pesto Genovese Pasta. On a cold day, forget a salad, let’s go for something a little more heartwarming and satisfying? Makes sauce for 400 g of pasta.

Course Sauce
Category Italian
Prep Time 15 minutes
Total Time 15 minutes
Servings 4
Autor Elle

Ingredients

  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • pinch of sea salt
  • 1 cup fresh basil, Genovese basil or buy fresh at the market, not too strong (50 g)
  • 1 tablespoon pine nuts (5 g)
  • 7 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil (100 ml)
  • 2 tablespoons Pecorino cheese or Grana padano cheese (30 g)
  • 1/3 cup parmigiano reggiano cheese (80 g)

Method

  1. Finely crush the garlic and salt, add the basil leaves one hand at the time, add the pine nuts and then the cheese.
  2. Add some of the extra virgin olive oil and keep pounding and/or mixing until you obtain a fine and smooth creamy sauce. Do not cook pesto!
  3. Trofie and trenette are the pasta used in Liguria but linguine or spaghetti al dente also go very well with this sauce.

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Lemon Anchovy Dressing

On a recent trip to Aix de Provence, I had an amazing yet simple Provencal style salad consisting of Belgium endives in a lemony anchovy dressing. I know anchovies aren’t for everyone but if they are good quality and packed in a decent quality olive oil their taste positively stands out from the rest of the pack. Yes, they are salty, but they shouldn’t be too salty. So trying to recreate this dressing myself, I thought best keep it simple. Isn’t that the magic of most Mediterranean dishes? This dressing would go so well with so many different salads. Next time I will try adding another dimension to this simple Belgium endive and parley salad and add 1 tablespoon of chopped capers along with a sprinkle of freshly grated parmesan. Or perhaps throw in a handful of frisée using the pale and delicate inner leaves which are crisper and sweeter. Mmm, I can taste it now! Another brilliant option would be to use this dressing for a Niçoise style salad – using sustainable tuna please, which means yellow fin tuna.

Anchovies add flavor factor

Anchovy magic. Surely you’ve already tasted the mmm-inducing flavor that anchovies contribute to well-loved caesar salad. So what is their power? Well…I have been hearing a lot about umami foods lately. Anchovies are one of them and I guess that’s why they are such a great complement to slightly bitter salad leaves. What is umami and why is everyone talking about it? A new taste sensation? The fifth taste element?

Endivie salad with Lemon Anchovy Dressing

Lemon Anchovy Dressing with umami magic

I used to think it was because various sensations of sweetness, saltiness, sourness, and even bitterness were coming together in perfect harmony and balance. But some time ago I learned that it might not be because of these four tastes at all, but because of another sensation: the fifth element known as umami. First identified by a Japanese scientist a century ago, umami has long been an obscure culinary concept. Hard to describe, it is usually defined as a meaty, savory, satisfying taste.

Umami is a relatively new concept to me, but it has been well known in parts of Asia for almost a century. Identified by Japanese scientist, Kikunae Ikeda, he coined the name umami (pronounced “oo-MA-mee”) which is the Japanese term for “deliciousness.” Long an obscure culinary concept, it is more and more understood as playing an important role in making food taste delicious. Ikeda, discovered that foods with the umami taste have a high level of glutamate, and guess what? He’s the same person who developed and patented the method for making monosodium glutamate (MSG), a processed additive that adds umami taste to food. Something not all of us react well too, so as with other chemical “flavor enhancers”, best avoided. Thankfully, there are a number of natural foods that have the umami effect.

Lemon Anchovy Dressing
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Lemon Anchovy Dressing

Lemon and Anchovy Dressing. Yes. Anchovy magic. Surely you've already tasted the mmm-inducing flavor that anchovies contribute to well-loved caesar salad.
Course Dressing
Category Mediterranean
Prep Time 5 minutes
Total Time 5 minutes
Servings 4
Autor Elle

Ingredients

  • 6 tablespoons freshly squeezed organic lemon juice
  • 4 anchovy filets packed in oil, drained and finely chopped
  • 8 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • pinch of red pepper flakes
  • sea salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

Method

  1. Combine ingredients in a small ceramic bowl. Whisk until well combined. Alternatively, use a small jar, put the lid on it and shake well.
  2. Toss gently with greens until coated.

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Broccoli Pesto Pasta

Luckily, we have one child that absolutely loves broccoli. Another is very lukewarm about the prospects of eating it, while the third, I had to make a deal with him that he could eat carrot sticks instead of steamed broccoli. So how do you get kids and adults alike to eat more of their greens? Pesto is a good trick. Okay, perhaps not with the volume of garlic I like to use, but essentially the idea behind it works. This broccoli pesto is my “grown up” version, with a healthy portion of garlic, chili flakes and tangy lemon. You may ask yourself but why a pesto from broccoli? Do we really need to change something that already works? Sure, why not. I love broccoli and I love the idea of finding more interesting ways to eat it, other than my usual ho-hum-lightly-steamed-served-on-the side version. Not only is this broccoli pesto fabulous served with pasta, it’s a great alternative to standard Genovese pesto spread on a sandwich or a wrap.

Broccoli Pesto

NOTE: I mashed my broccoli with a fork and used my hand operated mini blender to chop up the garlic and pine nuts, but a pestle and mortar works also fine, or if you have a blender or food processor you can just throw all the ingredients in it and pulse them for about a minute.

When using pine nuts, be sure toast them first to bring out their nutty flavor.

Broccoli Pesto
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Broccoli Pesto

Not only is this broccoli pesto served with pasta, it’s a great alternative to standard Genovese pesto spread on a sandwich or a wrap. This broccoli pesto is my “grown up” version, with a healthy portion of garlic, chili flakes and tangy lemon.
Course Main Course
Category Italian
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 25 minutes
Servings 4
Autor Elle

Ingredients

  • 400 g pasta of choice, plus 1/2 cup (125 ml) reserved cooking liquid
  • 2 large broccoli heads, cut into flowerets, quartered if large, stems removed (250 g)
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 large organic lemon
  • 1/2 teaspoon chili flakes
  • 3 tablespoons pine nuts, lightly toasted
  • 5 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 4 tablespoons freshly grated parmesan, plus more for serving
  • sea salt and freshly ground pepper

Method

  1. Cut the lemon in half to set aside.
  2. Steam the broccoli for 4 minutes. In a large bowl, mash the broccoli with a fork (alternatively, use a food processor and blend until finely chopped).
  3. Mix together the garlic, juice from one half the lemon, chili flakes, pine nuts and olive oil with the broccoli and process until it becomes a smooth paste. Taste it. Add a tad more olive oil if it seems too dry, plus a little salt and pepper, according to taste.
  4. Meanwhile, cook pasta according to packet directions, until al dente, in a large pot of salted, boiling water. Drain, reserving 1/2 cup (125 ml) cooking liquid, and return pasta to pot.

  5. Mix together the drained pasta with the pesto mixture and add enough of the reserved pasta water to form a sauce (adding a little at a time until it reaches the desired consistency). Cook over medium-high for 1 to 2 minutes, tossing the mixture until evenly coated.
  6. Serve into four serving bowls. Squeeze the juice of one half of lemon on top of each bowl of pasta. Drizzle with a little olive oil. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Garnish with parmesan and serve. Enjoy!

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Thyme-Infused Roasted Garlic Spread

Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication. I love garlic in all its forms. Roasted garlic for it’s sweet, mellow, creamy, nutty flavor. You can toss with pasta, or in a salad dressing, spread it on bread, add it to potatoes, garnish a roasted chicken, use it to add depth to a sauce, the list goes on and on…This spread, each bite is pure heaven. And if you too are a garlic lover, the aroma of the thyme and the garlic cloves as they roast in the over may just leave you in heavenly state of awe.

Knoblauch@Markt-WEB
Roasted garlic is so wonderfully simple to prepare. All you need to do is chop off the tops, drizzle it with olive oil, wrap it up tight, and toss it in the oven. Voila! Roasting it in a baking dish with a little more olive oil and some herbs creates a wonderfully herb and garlic-infused oil, which can be used on it own or blended with the cloves to make a lovely spread. So don’t think about skimping on the oil, pour generously.

Garlic for Thyme-Infused Roasted Garlic Spread

Thyme-Infused Roasted Garlic Spread
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Thyme-Infused Roasted Garlic Spread

Roasted garlic for it's sweet, mellow, creamy, nutty flavor. You can toss with pasta, or in a salad dressing, spread it on bread, add it to potatoes, garnish a roasted chicken.
Course Appetizer
Category Mediterranean
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour
Total Time 1 hour 10 minutes
Servings 6
Autor Elle

Ingredients

  • 2 large heads garlic
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 8-10 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon fresh black pepper

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 425°F / 200°C.
  2. Cut off and discard about 1 cm from tops of garlic heads, making sure that all cloves are exposed. Put garlic in a baking dish with the olive oil, thyme, salt, and pepper and cover with a double layer of aluminum foil. Crimp the edges tightly.
  3. Roast until the garlic bulbs are golden and tender, about 1 to 1 1/4 hours.
  4. When garlic is cool enough to handle, squeeze cloves into a bowl (the cloves will pop right out of the paper skin when squeezed - and if you are impatient like I am then use a couple forks to hold and squeeze out the flesh).
  5. Pour the oil through a fine-mesh sieve onto garlic. Mash well with a fork and season with salt.
  6. Serve with ciabatta bread.

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“Homestead” Lemon and Avocado Dressing

I really love a good avocado. My favorite way to eat one is sliced in half, core removed, drizzled with olive oil and a splash of balsamic vinegar, topped with a generous sprinkle of coarse sea salt and freshly ground pepper. Amazing! Actually, this was introduced to me by my German boyfriend. I had never dreamed of eating an avocado by itself, but was amazed by the results. Simple and delicious, I wouldn’t dream of living without this tasty snack.
“Homestead” Lemon and Avocado Dressing
There are countless ways to add avocado to a salad, but what about using it to create a avocado dressing? Although I enjoy a creamy dressing from time to time, I actually can’t say I am a fan of mayonnaise or sour cream-based dressings…or mayo-based anything for that matter. Actually, I am pretty much anti-condiment of any kind. I’m sure homemade mayo tastes lovely, but truth is, I can’t be bothered to make a batch just so I can add few dollops to my salad dressing. Instead, I decided to play around with alternatives. Yogurt and avocado. Plus a little lemon…a naturally good pair to avocado. Together in a dressing, this trio makes for a delicious alternative to classic ranch dressing. Not only is it healthier, but if you suffer from an allergy or sensitivity to eggs or vinegar, then this is the perfect substitute. So what shall we call it. Hmmm yocado….how about homestead? It’s kinda like a ranch.

If you love avocado the way I do, then you will love this dressing. It’s easy to make and full of flavor! Enjoy all it has to offer by serving with mild greens, such as butter or lamb’s lettuce. For added pep, throw in some grape tomatoes and lightly roasted pine nuts.

Avocado-Dressing mit Zitrone und Joghurt
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"Homestead" Lemon and Avocado Dressing

There are countless ways to add avocado to a salad, but what about using it to create a avocado dressing? Without mayonnaise or sour cream-based, this healthy dressings is a great alternative.
Course Dressing
Category American
Prep Time 10 minutes
Total Time 10 minutes
Servings 250 ml Glass
Autor Elle

Ingredients

  • 1 ripe avocado
  • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons Greek yogurt
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt, or to taste

Method

  1. Combine all ingredients in a small bowl and stir until well-combined.
  2. Toss with greens directly before serving.

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